We serve as an interdisciplinary focal point for the study of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, nationality, religious difference, and abilities both here and abroad, today, and in the past. Our courses, which range from classes that delve into the meanings of prejudice and discrimination to a class that prepares you for your international study abroad experiences, and our rich selection of programming, provide many opportunities to explore and experience the world and prepare you for the challenges that await you. Please join us on the exhilarating journey as we explore people, places, and personal and global issues.

 Isn’t it time for Miamians to start listening respectfully to each other? Let’s #BeTheChangeMiami.

Voices Intergroup Dialogue helps students...

 Tone McKoy headshotHave conversations about difficult topics.

"When you don’t [have conversations about difficult topics], you start to believe that they’re solved or that they’re over with. I think it’s important to keep having these conversations so that we know where we’re at as a society."–Tone McKoy

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Natalee Price headshotEngage in healthy conversation.

"It’s really important to figure out ways to engage in healthy conversation given that there are a lot of downstream mental health effects where individuals are struggling to have these conversations or when individuals feel like they can’t have these conversations and from a mental health perspective, I see it as something that contributes to a more sustainable society and would probably benefit physical and mental health long-term.”–Natalee Price

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Pankhuri Aggarawal headshotHave conversations with individuals from different backgrounds.

“This is a more practical application of how do you engage with individuals, how do you facilitate that conversation with individuals from different backgrounds, not just research about it theoretically, not just read about it because it’s easy to come to those conclusions when you read about it, but until you actually have a face-to-face conversation and learn what are these skills that are required.”–Pankhuri Aggarawal

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Alejandro Trujillo headshotWhen having conversations with people from other identities than their own.

“I think it’s really important because more and more, we’re seeing that students have this growing interest in how do I be more discerning and more careful with other identities, how do I better speak to minorities and to women and to people with different immigration status, things like that, which is a wonderful thing, but at the same time, I think the scary thing that a lot of students face is that they want to be a part of that conversation, but I don’t have the words and I don’t want to be offensive.”–Alejandro Trujillo

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